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MRI shoots woman, a Betelgeuse eclipse and other top science news of the week


Our most read science stories this week contain some timeless life lessons. First, don't go into an MRI room carrying metal, especially if that metal is a loaded gun. Two, don't cross a killer whale, even if you are a great white shark. And finally, never judge a sea cucumber by its cover—no matter how repulsive that cover may appear. – Rose Pastore

Woman walks into MRI machine with gun, gets shot in butt

Picture: nimon (Shutterstock)

A woman's medical exam turned into a literal pain in the butt thanks to a misplaced firearm. An adverse event report sent to the Food and Drug Administration describes an alleged incident in which the woman was shot in the right buttock by her own gun activated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. – Ed Cara Read more


Critical rocket components end up being crushed on a dangerous satellite mission

A Vega C rocket prior to launch.

A Vega C rocket prior to launch.
photo: ESA

The final mission of the European Space Agency's Vega rocket has suffered a strange setback. The core propellant tanks required for its final flight were mysteriously damaged in a landfill, jeopardizing the planned 2024 launch. – George Dvorsky Read more


The iconic star Betelgeuse will temporarily disappear from the sky next week

Betelgeuse, as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope on August 13, 2020.

Betelgeuse, as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope on August 13, 2020.
Picture: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2. Credits: Davide De Martin

The bright star Betelgeuse, a prominent member of the constellation Orion, is set to be obscured by the asteroid Leona on December 11. This event, expected to last no longer than 10 seconds, will cause the star to temporarily disappear from view, a phenomenon visible along a narrow path to Earth. – George Dvorsky Read more


Orcas attacked a great white shark and ate its insides. Again.

An orca whale has been spotted in Canada's Johnstone Strait, British Columbia.

A great white shark that washed up near Portland, Australia in October was killed and eaten by orcas, according to researchers who studied the fish's remains. - Read more


NASA Discovers Root Cause of Parachute Malfunction During Asteroid Sample Landing

The sample return capsule on the ground in Utah.

Inconsistent labels in the OSIRIS-REx landing plans are what caused the parachute to improperly deploy during the descent of the return capsule to Earth on September 24, NASA says. – Isaac Schultz Read more


Gizmodo Monday Puzzle: You can solve this viral one math test?

Image for article titled MRI Shoots Woman, a Betelgeuse Eclipse, and more top science news of the week

Picture: : Shutterstock Graphics: Vicky Leta

Every few months, a math problem goes viral on media. This week's puzzle comes from an actual problem in a math test given to students in Singapore that went viral because it caused cracks between the solutions. It is a difficult logic exercise unlike any exam problem from my school days. – Jack Murtagh Read more


Magnesium supplements could protect your liver from acetaminophen

Image for article titled MRI Shoots Woman, a Betelgeuse Eclipse, and more top science news of the week

Picture: Sergei Neanderthalek (Shutterstock)

Magnesium supplements may be able to alleviate a known side effect of the pain reliever acetaminophen, also known as Tylenol, new research suggests. The study found evidence in laboratory animals that oral magnesium can prevent acetaminophen-related liver damage by affecting the gut microbiome. – Ed Cara Read more


'Designer Shrooms' Could Come as Scientists Unlock Genetics of Magic Mushrooms

Psilocybe cubensis mushrooms.

Psilocybe cubensis mushrooms.
Picture: YAR photographer (Shutterstock)

Researchers in Australia analyzed the genomes of more than 100 commercial and wild varieties Psilocybe cubensis, a psychoactive fungus known as the magic mushroom. The findings may eventually help growers develop "designer flowers" that have their own unique health benefits, the team says. – Ed Cara Read more


Το «Charged Lemonade» του Panera κατηγορείται για δεύτερο θάνατο σε νέα

Image for article titled MRI Shoots Woman, a Betelgeuse Eclipse, and more top science news of the week

Picture: photo-denver (Shutterstock)

Panera Bread is once again accused of causing someone's death with its highly caffeinated 'Charged Lemonade' energy drink. The family of 46-year-old Dennis Brown filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the chain this week, alleging that Brown's heart-related death in early October was caused by drinking. It's the second such claim against the company this year, but Panera has denied responsibility for any deaths. – Ed Cara Read more


This sea creature could fight cancer, it looks like a pickle

A specimen of Stichopus cf horrens collected from plastic pens inside the Bolinao Marine Laboratory at the UP Marine Science Institute.

A Stichopus c.eat. horrens sample collected from plastic pens inside the Bolinao Marine Laboratory at the UP Institute of Marine Sciences.
Picture: Hiyas A. Junio

Great things can come in small, slightly off-putting packages. Scientists in the Philippines have detailed its molecular secrets Stichopus see horrens, a type of sea cucumber that bears more than a passing resemblance to something else. Their findings indicate that these animals contain several compounds that could have potential medical benefits in humans, including anticancer agents. – Ed Cara Read more




VIA: gizmodo.com

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